Tag Archives: N64

GreatBitVlog 14: Willy’s big awesome box of GameBoy games!

holyGBGAMES

I’m perfectly aware that I’m a lazy son of a bitch who’ll do everything half arsed. Such as release a Vlog on Youtube, but not release it on my own damn web site! Not to mention it’s a pretty big deal seeing as it’s a big box of GameBoy games sent to me from the hella awesome William Culver, the host of the Arcade USA show on Youtube. But let me get this over and done with; honestly though, I should’ve done this a week ago!

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GreatBitVlog 13: They’re selling N64 Jumper Paks?

YouWot

Time for some catch up, seeing as I appear to still be bad at organising this blog! In Today’s Vlog I talk about something weird I noticed today when I found a charity shop selling an N64 Jumper Pak. The thing you use in order to boot up the console, you only ever remove it if you’re installing an Expansion Pak into your system. But after a bit of talking to people on Twitter it turns out that some retailers where known to remove jumper paks out of pre-owned N64 systems!

Not only that, I talk a bit about the announced Zelda Netflix TV show, Persona 5, and an awesome modded PS1 with a model of Final Fantasy VII’s Midgar on the top of it! Continue reading

Why I Hate Achievements

I dislike Achievements, Trophies, Awards, Stamps, and/or any other form of in-game pop-up that encourages my self esteem and ego. I have good reasons why, that’s why I’m writing a blog about it.

XboxAlist

When Microsoft announced achievements for the Xbox 360, it sounded like a great idea, to me and to a whole lot of other people too. We were all hooked, and people are still hooked, except for me. Eventually, I discovered that achievements are just things to improve your “E-Penis” on Xbox Live and your friends. Sure, that element might sound good to people, but what I see in achievements is a list of things to do in a game so that you look good at playing them; in other words, it’s a long list of in game chores to do to “extend your experience in the game”. Or as I like to call it “Create content without actually making any content.” Continue reading

Virtual Console Games you Should already have (need) on your Wii: Part 3!

Here’s the final part of “What virtual console game you should have!”. So what will we have here then!?

Actraiser

  

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Impressions and a peek at Hyrule Historia

OK, if you haven’t kept up with Stalking the Retro, RetroGaming Round up and my Twitter, you wouldn’t have known that I was a little excited about a certain Nintendo Art book…

I just made a #PreOrder for Hyrule Historia on @amazon
— Great Bit Blog (@GreatBitBlog) January 20, 2013

Check out what I got today! @nintendo #HyruleHistoria #ShigeruMiyamoto #EijiAomuna twitter.com/GreatBitBlog/s…
— Great Bit Blog (@GreatBitBlog) January 28, 2013

Oh yeah! I was a very lucky boy today and received my copy of Hyrule Historia almost a week before I was expecting to receive it! Not only that, but I didn’t even pay for Amazon’s overnight shipping, I went with their free five day delivery, yet I still receive the book a day before actual retail release!

A book for the fans. OK OK it’s not the £40 leather bound version, but it will still be a piece of history!
Open the book and you see the ancient mural seen in Skyward Sword. 

There are plenty of pictures and artwork from the Skyward Sword game. This itself almost takes up a third of the book!
The many faces of Link. Remember kiddies, there are more than one Link.
The famous “Official Zelda Time Line” Page on the right.
Shigeru’s Early art for the NES/Famicom Legend of Zelda.
Amazing colour sketches of the NES game’s concept art. I’ve never seen these before!
The art for Zelda in “Link to the Past” that shows the unused Futuristic Zelda.
The Story behind Ocarina of Time.
The Story behind Link to the past.
Details about the DS games and “New Hyrule”. I never got the beat Phatom Hourglass, and I didn’t get myself a copy of Spirit Tracks; maybe I should get myself a copy to learn more about “New Hyrule”.
The many-many different versions of Midna seen in Twilight Princess.
An article about Eiji Aonuma (The game’s producer) near the end of the book.
The Zelda Manga at the back of the book, remember kids, to read Manga, you read right to left!

The impression I got from the book is simply this, “This is the Zelda Fan’s book!”. It’s comprehensive, (despite most of the book is based on the latest game, Skyward Sword.), BIG! It has more than 270 pages with each page a little bigger than an A4 sheet of paper, and each sheet is glossy and thick, the quality of the book itself is very high and the hard cover itself feels like it can take a beating. Not only does this book show art work, it’s a descent history book that explains it’s confusing continuity very well, not only with it’s explained time line chart, but in the written articles for each game too. It’s nice to see artwork from characters  scenes, and levels that were not used in the games. The unused “Future Zelda” from Link to the Past was very interesting, the many faces of Midna from Twilight Princess, and all the characters seen from the DS games that I have yet to play stir my curiosity for the franchise even more than before. Even if maybe you’re not a Zelda fan, or maybe you haven’t played a Zelda game before, this book is still worth getting just to see the artwork and the amount of work that went into the Zelda franchise. It’s a definite purchase and read for any gamer!

What made this Nintendo fan-boy broaden his horizons?

As a kid in the nineties, Super Mario was my hero, and Nintendo is where you played Mario games. My first experience with Sega and Sonic wasn’t a great one as I thought it was too fast and too hard for my 7 year old mind. So through out the nineties I was a big supporter and fan of Nintendo, disliking Sega, and eventually disliking Sony due to the PlayStation’s “slow” loading discs. But by the turn of the Millennium, my tastes in video games were going to grow a lot, but how did this once Nintendo Fan boy buy himself a PlayStation in 2001 you ask?!

Dance Dance Revolution and Dancing Stage…

Yup, it’s a little embarrassing to admit it, but when I went to the Millennium Dome in London back in 1999, there was a tiny arcade inside, and one of the few machines inside, with a couple of Pinball machines and crane games was a Dancing Stage. For those outside Europe, Dancing Stage was the name to Dance Dance Revolution in Europe, no idea why, hunting on Google and Wikipedia didn’t give any results either, but regardless to the name change, it was the same game by Konami with a couple of licensed tracks thrown in. I popped in a £1 coin and began to play the game. As to anyone playing a dance machine for the first time, I was terrible at it, but at least I got to my third and final round before failing. There was a lady in this tiny booth watching me play the game. And when I had finished she walked out and pulled out a plush toy from one of the crane games and had told me that I was the only person who had gotten to the third round since the Millennium Dome was opened. I was kinda chuffed, accepted the toy, and began to think on how to could get that game home.

That’s where it struck me. The only Nintendo versions of Dancing Stage and Dance Dance Revolution were only available in Japan, there was a version on Game Boy Color that came with a mini platform you mounted on top on the portable as you make your fingers do the dancing. I thought that was pretty silly (I say that when most people think stomping your feat on pink and blue glass panels is silly!), there was an actual version of DDR on the N64 in Japan, but it was the Disney Rave Mix, Disney “Rave” Mix? I’d hate to see what happens to Mickey when dropping Es at a rave. In the mean while, I was waiting to go on holiday to the coast to scour the piers and arcades for actual Dance Machines. The waiting and hoping that a version of DDR and Dancing Stage could appear on the N64, Dancing Stage Euro Mix got released in 2001 for the PlayStation. At that point I thought to myself, I can’t play DDR on the N64, I gotta go and get myself one of those “Slow Loading” PlayStations. At the time the PS2 was reaching it’s first year in Europe, and I didn’t care for it then, I wanted to see how cheap I could get a PlayStation 1 just so I could get my DDR fix. Before Christmas of 2001, I managed to buy an original PlayStation 1, not the PSOne, from a bloke at a Market/Car Boot sale for £40 (I still regret paying that price for a second-hand PlayStation) and got myself a copy of Dancing Stage Euro Mix and a dance mat from GAME. So I got what I wanted, a system that I got my DDR fix from. But as time slowly moved on, I would return to the same car boot sale for other PlayStation games that might grab my interest.

Someone bought this for £94.90!? Ouch…

Going with the Rhythm game theme, Europe got Beat Mania, think DJ Hero before DJ Hero existed, and was made by Konami, the same people who made Dancing Stage and DDR. It was a pack that came with a poorly made turn table controller that broke on me. I handed it back to the bloke at the car boot and demanded a refund, but he refused; at around the same time I noticed that GAME were selling off copies of Beat Mania to clear space in their warehouses for a fiver a piece, I bought one, then handed over the one I bought from the Car Boot Sale inside the box that I got from GAME to get my money back.

And into more Rhythm Games, I got a copy of Vib Ribbon. Now this is an interesting game as it never got a US release. Developed by Nana Onsha, the same team behind Parappa the Rapper. Vib Ribbon was a simple game whereby you jump over obstacles of different shapes generated from the sound being made from your music CDs. There are 8 different obstacles, each obstacle had to be jumped over in a different way by pressing a different button on the PlayStation controller; some required you to press two buttons at once. Think of this game like a Canabalt or Temple Run; you play as a wire frame bunny rabbit character who is running to the right (or the left depending on the camera angle) and you jump over holes and walls, it’s a rhythm version of an endless runner game, except it’s not really endless as the level would end at the end of the track.

Something a little different from Rhythm games, Final Fantasy IX. Before I got the PlayStation, I owned the PC version of Final Fantasy VII, and loved the crap out of it. There was a version of Final Fantasy VIII for the PC, but I didn’t know where to find a copy, and Final Fantasy IX never had a PC release. But with my own PlayStation, and a WH Smith £10 book voucher, I got myself a copy of Final Fantasy IX. For the time I had it I enjoyed it, though I didn’t beat it, and by the time the GameCube came out, I traded it in for a copy of Super Smash Bros Melee at a local small Games Shop that I would eventually hate big time.

After this revelation in gaming, this Nintendo Fan Boy was fan boy no more, my taste in games were broaden, and soon after picked myself up a DreamCast, and used eBay and Car Boot sales to pick up other consoles such as the Master System, a Mega Drive, and later on pick up a TurboGrafx and an Atari 2600.

So yeah, DDR made me like other systems, Let’s dance!

Dont ask me why exercising anthropomorphic rabbits and Cotton Eye Joe have in common…  Only Konami knows! lol!